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Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Martinmas




Christ appears to St. Martin

ACCORDINGLY, at a certain period, when he had nothing except his arms and his simple military dress, in the middle of winter, a winter which had shown itself more severe than ordinary, so that the extreme cold was proving fatal to many, he happened to meet at the gate of the city of Amiens a poor man destitute of clothing. He was entreating those that passed by to have compassion upon him, but all passed the wretched man without notice, when Martin, that man full of God, recognized that a being to whom others showed no pity, was, in that respect, left to him. Yet, what should he do? He had nothing except the cloak in which he was clad, for he had already parted with the rest of his garments for similar purposes. Taking, therefore, his sword with which he was girt, he divided his cloak into two equal parts, and gave one part to the poor man, while he again clothed himself with the remainder. Upon this, some of the by-standers laughed, because he was now an unsightly object, and stood out as but partly dressed. Many, however, who were of sounder understanding, groaned deeply because they themselves had done nothing similar. They especially felt this, because, being possessed of more than Martin, they could have clothed the poor man without reducing themselves to nakedness. In the following night, when Martin had resigned himself to sleep, he had a vision of Christ arrayed in that part of his cloak with which he had clothed the poor man. He contemplated the Lord with the greatest attention, and was told to own as his the robe which he had given. Ere long, he heard Jesus saying with a clear voice to the multitude of angels standing round -- "Martin, who is still but a catechumen, clothed me with this robe." The Lord, truly mindful of his own words (who had said when on earth -- "Inasmuch as ye have done these things to one of the least of these, ye have done them unto me"), declared that he himself had been clothed in that poor man; and to confirm the testimony he bore to so good a deed, he condescended to show him himself in that very dress which the poor man had received. After this vision the sainted man was not puffed up with human glory, but, acknowledging the goodness of God in what had been done, and being now of the age of twenty years, he hastened to receive baptism. He did not, however, all at once, retire from military service, yielding to the entreaties of his tribune, whom he admitted to be his familiar tent-companion. For the tribune promised that, after the period of his office had expired, he too would retire from the world. Martin, kept back by the expectation of this event, continued, although but in name, to act the part of a soldier, for nearly two years after he had received baptism.

Martin Retires from Military Service
IN the meantime, as the barbarians were rushing within the two divisions of Gaul, Julian Cæsar, bringing an army together at the city of the Vaugiones, began to distribute a donative to the soldiers. As was the custom in such a case, they were called forward, one by one, until it came to the turn of Martin. Then, indeed, judging it a suitable opportunity for seeking his discharge--for he did not think it would be proper for him, if he were not to continue in the service, to receive a donative--he said to Cæsar, "Hitherto I have served you as a soldier: allow me now to become a soldier to God: let the man who is to serve thee receive thy donative: I am the soldier of Christ: it is not lawful for me to fight." Then truly the tyrant stormed on hearing such words, declaring that, from fear of the battle, which was to take place on the morrow, and not from any religious feeling, Martin withdrew from the service. But Martin, full of courage, yea all the more resolute from the danger that had been set before him, exclaims, "If this conduct of mine is ascribed to cowardice, and not to faith, I will take my stand unarmed before the line of battle tomorrow, and in the name of the Lord Jesus, protected by the sign of the cross, and not by shield or helmet, I will safely penetrate the ranks of the enemy." He is ordered, therefore, to be thrust back into prison, determined on proving his words true by exposing himself unarmed to the barbarians. But, on the following day, the enemy sent ambassadors to treat about peace and surrendered both themselves and all their possessions. In these circumstances who can doubt that this victory was due to the saintly man? It was granted him that he should not be sent unarmed to the fight. And although the good Lord could have preserved his own soldier, even amid the swords and darts of the enemy, yet that his blessed eyes might not be pained by witnessing the death of others, he removed all necessity for fighting. For Christ did not require to secure any other victory in behalf of his own soldier, than that, the enemy being subdued without bloodshed, no one should suffer death.

Martin Converts a Robber
FROM that time quitting military service, Martin earnestly sought after the society of Hilarius, bishop of the city Pictava, whose faith in the things of God was then regarded as of high renown, and in universal esteem. For some time Martin made his abode with him. Now, this same Hilarius, having instituted him in the office of the diaconate, endeavored still more closely to attach him to himself, and to bind him by leading him to take part in Divine service. But when he constantly refused, crying out that he was unworthy, Hilarius, as being a man of deep penetration, perceived that he could only be constrained in this way, if he should lay that sort of office upon him, in discharging which there should seem to be a kind of injury done him. He therefore appointed him to be an exorcist. Martin did not refuse this appointment, from the fear that he might seem to have looked down upon it as somewhat humble. Not long after this, he was warned in a dream that he should visit his native land, and more particularly his parents, who were still involved in heathenism, with a regard for their religious interests. He set forth in accordance with the expressed wish of the holy Hilarius, and, after being adjured by him with many prayers and tears, that he would in due time return. According to report Martin entered on that journey in a melancholy frame of mind, after calling the brethren to witness that many sufferings lay before him. The result fully justified this prediction. For, first of all, having followed some devious paths among the Alps, he fell into the hands of robbers. And when one of them lifted up his axe and poised it above Martin's head, another of them met with his right hand the blow as it fell; nevertheless, having had his hands bound behind his back, he was handed over to one of them to be guarded and stripped. The robber, having led him to a private place apart from the rest, began to enquire of him who he was. Upon this, Martin replied that he was a Christian. The robber next asked him whether he was afraid. Then indeed Martin most courageously replied that he never before had felt so safe, because he knew that the mercy of the Lord would be especially present with him in the midst of trials. He added that he grieved rather for the man in whose hands he was, because, by living a life of robbery, he was showing himself unworthy of the mercy of Christ. And then entering on a discourse concerning Evangelical truth, he preached the word of God to the robber. Why should I delay stating the result? The robber believed; and, after expressing his respect for Martin, he restored him to the way, entreating him to pray the Lord for him. That same robber was afterwards seen leading a religious life; so that, in fact, the narrative I have given above is based upon an account furnished by himself.

8 comments:

St. Jude Pray For Me said...

Thank you, Dear Rev. Fr. Michael Mary, F.SS.R. , for your record of St. Martin.

In this pitiless age where racism and bigotry prevail over humanity and where dullards incite to violence against poor and needy people, all we have the duty to ponder St. Martin's lesson.

Christ is Mercy and Love; if we reject the stranger, the poor and the suffering, then we reject Christ Himself.

Do you remember Sally Trench ? She was a true Christian even if not Catholic, she has dedicated herself to comfort and support London homeless and beatniks;
in this way she has fully put into practice St. Martin's lesson.

Now I leave you all with a simple question: are we ready to follow St. Martin's example ?

With All Respect
A.B.

wheat4paradise said...

A.B.,

If Sally Trench had entered into the fullness of the Catholic Faith, then she would have fully put St. Martin's lesson into practice. I'm sure that Sally Trench was a wonderful person, yet I think that Blessed Mother Teresa is a more apt example of someone who fully lived the lesson of St. Martin.

God bless,

David

St. Jude Pray For Me said...

Dear " wheat4paradise ",

Why start a debate ?
I can assure you that no homeless has ever asked to his / her benefactors about their religion.
If you are a good and charitable man you are blessed by God, no matter if you are Catholic, Protestant or Orthodox cause this is not God's criterion.

At the end, " wheat4paradise ", let me suggest you to visit an SVP Office and a Salvation Army Mission: in both you'll find St. Martin at work.

Yours
A.B.

wheat4paradise said...

A.B,

I've started a debate because the truth matters. You say that the protestant Sally Trench is a "true Christian", yet what is the criterion of a "true Christian"? Can a person who is separated from the Body of Christ by heresy and schism be called "a true Christian" on the basis of good deeds alone? Need I remind you of an infallible and irreformable TRUTH of the Catholic Faith:

The most Holy Roman Church firmly believes, professes and preaches that none of those existing outside the Catholic Church, not only pagans, but also Jews and heretics and schismatics, can have a share in life eternal; but that they will go into the eternal fire which was prepared for the devil and his angels, unless before death they are joined with Her; and that so important is the unity of this ecclesiastical body that only those remaining within this unity can profit by the sacraments of the Church unto salvation, and they alone can receive an eternal recompense for their fasts, their almsgivings, their other works of Christian piety and the duties of a Christian soldier. No one, let his almsgiving be as great as it may, no one, even if he pour out his blood for the Name of Christ, can be saved, unless he remain within the bosom and the unity of the Catholic Church.” (Pope Eugene IV, the Bull Cantate Domino, 1441)

The soul is more important than the body. Blessed Mother Teresa labored for the SALVATION OF SOULS, not merely the healing of bodies. Her enemies, e.g., Christopher Hitchens, know this, and they despise her for it.

Anonymous said...

The highest fruit of education is tolerannce, according to Helen Keller.

The desert will flower.

E H-S

St. Jude Pray For Me said...

Mother Teresa of Calcutta quotes:

"IF YOU JUDGE PEOPLE, YOU HAVE NO TIME TO LOVE THEM"

"One must really have suffered oneself to help others"

"I prefer you to make mistakes in kindness than work miracles in unkindness"

"Unless a life is lived for others, it is not worthwhile"

Yours
A.B.

wheat4paradise said...

A.B., I'm not quite sure what your point is with those quotes. In any case, let me close by saying that you shouldn't write things like "She was a true Christian even if not Catholic" and not expect to be called to task from a theological point of view.

Anonymous said...

Any comment on Abp Nicholls activities in the Hindu temple recently?

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